Category Archives: Inclusive Leaders in Action

Building Bridges to Inclusive and Equitable Education

How do Inclusive Leaders contribute to our communities in ways that “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”?  (United Nations SDG 4). 

How do Inclusive Leaders “provide all, especially children and youth, with educational opportunities that empower them to contribute actively to sustainable development”? (Earth Charter). 

This post was collaboratively written by Inclusive Leaders from around the world who spent two months sharing leadership on a guided online group expedition:  Discover Your Inclusive Leadership Potential.  Continue reading

Communicating With Care Includes Political Care

Speaking out to Request the Government of Quebec Review Bill 21.

Submitted by Silvia Mangue Alene.

(Silvia is the founder of Kulea Culture, a non-profit society located in Victoria, BC focused on equity, diversity and inclusion. Kulea Culture’s mission is to raise awareness about and reduce ethno-racial discrimination, prejudice and stereotyping through education, lectures, presentations, workshops, exhibitions, cultural exchange and research).

Inclusive Leadership to me means to include everyone in your leadership by listening to what others have to say and considering their points of view. Leading inclusively is to share not only your knowledge and time but also your vulnerabilities in ways that allow people to see your differences as gifts. Inclusive leaders encourage and elevate and invite others to join and to bring their differences. Inclusive leaders are compassionate, caring, smart and are wiling to serve and to give. And last but not least Inclusive Leadership is satisfactory and fulfilling.

My main goal for taking the “Discover Your Inclusive Leadership Potential” online course is to learn to communicate with care and compassion: Practice, practice and more practice. After participating in the Anti-Discrimination First Aid Module, “Chardi Kala” became my new motto. According to Canadian Member of Parliament Jagmeet Singh, Chardi Kala means rising spirits and a positive outlook in the face of hopeless odds and despair. I do believe that there is no other way to see the other if it is not with love. And this is something that I need to practice and I will be practicing until my last days.

Victoria Councillor, Sharmarke Dubow.
Photograph By ADRIAN LAM, TIMES COLONIST

Communicating with care in all aspects includes political care too. This is a transcript from a speech that I gave to Victoria City Council on July 11, 2019 in which I communicated with care about Quebec’s Bill 21 that was passed on June 17, 2019. Six of us presented (including Victoria Councillor, Sharmarke Dubow). It was a great moment for me as I have never done anything like that. I hope that more cities in Canada can speak against this Bill so that the Quebec government can review the Bill. I believe in human rights and so I will put myself out there if I am needed. Continue reading

Building Bridges to Literacy and Peace

Submitted by Victor Okechukwu Chimezie

I am Victor Okechukwu Chimezie  a 22 year old Nigerian, a passionate and pragmatic Peacebuilder. I’m so delighted to be here in the Discover Your Inclusive Leadership Potential online course. I’m so grateful for the  scholarship as this course will help me be more relaxed in diversity in my quest to make the world safer and better for us youth.

Part 1 of the Inclusive Leadership course introduces the Earth Charter as our global compass.

For my Earth Charter Action Plan I’ll be focusing on Peace which is Democracy, Non- Violence and Peace.

Continue reading

The Magic of Connecting With Differences

Submitted by Linda Hill and Bonnie Robertson (Reposted July 2019)

20161012_145816Inclusive Leadership can be as simple and magical as a diverse group of people exploring the skill of daring to be different through a co-operative game of “Catch the Difference.” As you read this story, we invite you to think about the times in your life when you have felt safe to share your differences with others and the times in your life when you helped others feel safe to share their differences with you.  Continue reading

Inviting You to Discover Your Inclusive Leadership Potential Online!

Submitted by Linda Hill

What an incredible time I am having sharing leadership with experienced and emerging Inclusive Leaders who have joined our online guided expedition: “Discover Your Inclusive Leadership Potential!”

Our new online course is such a satisfying way of carrying out the Inclusive Leadership Co-operative’s mission to bring together people from diverse backgrounds to nurture and mentor Inclusive Leadership development in ourselves, our communities and our world. I am enjoying myself so much that I am continuing to facilitate the course Discussion Forum throughout my summer camping vacation. Continue reading

Destination Unity

IMG_5702Submitted by Alan Cundall, Toronto, Ontario in 2016 (Reposted June 2019)

Inclusive Leaders come from many different backgrounds and bring what they learn at Inclusive Leadership back to many different communities. Alan Cundall has grown up in the Baha’i Faith Community and has experienced unity and inclusivity through his participation and facilitation within Junior Youth Spiritual Empowerment Groups.  Alan has also been participating in and facilitating within the Inclusive Leadership community for 7 years now (since 2009).  In this post, Alan shares his experiences exploring, sharing and celebrating the parallels between Inclusive Leadership and Junior Youth Spiritual Empowerment Groups. Continue reading

Is Climate Change an Inclusive Leadership Matter?

ILC - footprintSubmitted by Joy Emmanuel

The other day an email circulated with this question in relation to Inclusive Leadership supporting a collaborative community effort to have local government “declare a climate emergency.” Great question and an action that the co-op may want to take. I offer here a few further reflections.

As I write this blog post, I am sitting outdoors tucked into a little wooded area on the property where I live. From here, I have been enjoying getting to know some of the other local residents: a mother duck and her four chicks, the nightly chorus of frogs who sing to me from the pond, I recently met my first tree frog, occasionally I hear an owl hooting, and one day I was treated to seeing the flashing red vibrating head of a pileated woodpecker. It has been a great delight to meet these neighbours.

Some days; however, I wonder about the former residents who are no longer represented in the visible animal population in this neck of the woods. The ones who use to be plentiful but now are rarely seen. The ones who had to leave because there are no nesting sites; no food sources; few watering holes; their seasonal coat has not shed, and their fur is too warm in these hot early spring days.

June 18 - Post b.jpg

Supporting this diverse neighbourhood ecosystem are all the plants and trees that provide food, shelter, homes, shade and meet so many other needs. I am also wondering how they are doing. Last summer was very dry and although we live in a rain forest, this spring we have had a very low rainfall. June 18 - post c

Is climate change an inclusive leadership matter? The Inclusive Leadership Co-op endorses the Earth Charter. Inclusive Leadership encourages us to recognize and embrace diversity in all living beings.   The Earth is our Mother.   The plants and animals are All Our Relations! We are interconnected

Another IL voice adds to the email conversation: “[This concern] is not only inline with the Earth Charter but also inclusive leadership. Climate change will affect marginalized populations much harder than the 1%ers.”

There are so many inter-connections.

One of my mentors I turn to on this topic is Jane Goodall. After many years of being an advocate and voice for Mother Earth, she is often asked: Is there hope? Although she acknowledges it is sometimes hard to be optimistic, in her inspiring book Reasons for Hope, she offers four strong responses to this question:

  1. First, the miraculous ability of the human brain and the potential we have already demonstrated to solve so many challenges once thought impossible.
  2. Second, she reminds us of the amazing resilience of nature if we give her a chance – and a helping hand. She offers numerous stories of how Mother Nature can show us the way. One such example she names comes from right here in the Cowichan Valley! She refers to “a most remarkable forester, Merv Wilkonson” and his work at Wildwood Farm to sustainably manage a 136 acre forest. After “logging” it nine times it still has giant old trees and there are “more animal species there today than when he began.” Wow! So much is possible when we work with Mother Nature!
  3. Third, she takes the view that “hope lies in the new understanding, commitment and energy of young people around the world.” Empowering young people is her contribution to their future and the future of the planet. Inclusive Leadership also upholds this view.
  4. June 18 - post dHer fourth pillar of hope is all the amazing and wonderful people “who have set out to accomplish almost impossible things, and because they never gave up, achieved their goals against seemingly hopeless odds.” I know I have certainly met more than a few inspiring people like this at our wonderful Inclusive Leadership gatherings!

Yes, climate change is an inclusive leadership matter – a concern that is deeply challenging and one that connects us all. Embracing the spirit, the skills, and awareness of inclusive leadership is a place of hope, intent and possibility. Yes, government has a role to play, and so do we all in our own little “neck of the woods” in how we live each day!

May we find our way forward together!